Patrick Braden Woody  Cloth Mother, Wire Mother
       
     
Jillian Mayer Survivalist Art
       
     
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Aaron Wrinkle LA Salon
       
     
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Salomon Huerta Still Lifes
       
     
Anthony James
       
     
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there-there at Fort Gansevort NY
       
     
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Patrick Braden Woody  Cloth Mother, Wire Mother
       
     
Patrick Braden Woody Cloth Mother, Wire Mother

May 19 – June 23, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION

May 19, 6-8pm

Patrick Braden Woody’s art describes the presentness of memory, its startling touch, not memory as willed contemplation, but as a reflex reaction that pierces intention and perception. To be mothered is to be porous with little holes that let memory (and its illusions) through with an intensity that consciousness buffers and absorbs for other aspects of the past. Woody seems to use some of these holes to stitch through and even to thread back from the current self to the mother past and present. This sewing up, reattaching, tying off, and creating new loose ends is more tangled than reparative, but it does allow for active engagement and reworking.

This analogy is particularly apt for describing Woody’s art in that the fabric crafts he learned from and still practices with his mother are an important material and metaphorical aspect of his work. Embroidery, quilting, mending, and children’s dress-up games are the realm of the maternal culturally and symbolically. And Woody’s circumstances are rich for exploring in terms of maternal legacy. Raised in a conservative military household by an evangelical single mother who is also a master seamstress, Woody’s expressions of his queerness were rejected and constrained, confined to the home and to sharing in domestic, feminine handcrafts. In adulthood, this contradictory bond has become artistic collaboration, with Woody describing his mother Patricia Gould as his primary collaborator.

Woody’s work combines archival and restaged memories with abstract graphic renderings of key references, from the broken-shard geometry of quilting to the symbol of negation, obscenity, and genetics of the cross-stitched “x” – “xxx” “xx”. Embroidered numerals “6” and “9” merge the Christian code for evil with sex slang – “666” “69.” Textiles knit by his mother have served as hiding places or shrouds in performance work. A personal letter she wrote to her son is full of prayers but also a vision of “a deadly ending” in the form of AIDS. It is signed with a smiley face and the closing, “I love you precious one.” This tormenting combination of love and censure, intimacy and dogma, shapes much of Woody’s art. Woody sews a copy of a prayer sampler made by his mother, but he drains it of color and mounts it on chain link like a “Keep Out” sign. He sews the word “Mom” across his palms in black thread and kitsch lettering, transforming wholesome sentimentality into a repetitive act of self-wounding. The word recurs in the form of a branding iron, with stark letters rendered in rough black metal and attached to a handle, ready for fire and then skin. One of Woody’s most compelling works is by his mother, a polaroid photograph of the artist as a young child wearing a hair bow, high-heeled shoe, lipstick, and a shy but lively smile. The image is beautiful and playful, a picture of love, anxiety, and longing that foreshadows the probing reciprocity of Woody’s work as an artist.

Rachel Baum

Patrick Braden Woody (b. 1988, Colorado Springs, CO) graduated from California Institute of the Arts in 2011 and has since lived and worked in Joshua Tree, CA, Los Angeles, CA, and Colorado Springs, CO. Woody’s multidisciplinary practice explores the psychopathological effects of homophobia in the U.S. through the context of his relationship with his mother and primary collaborator, Patricia Gould. Woody has recently exhibited at PANEL, Los Angeles; Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC; High Desert Test Sites, Joshua Tree; Business of Art Center, Colorado Springs, Kunstverein Letschebach, Karlsruhe Germany; and Sunday Gallery, Los Angeles.

Jillian Mayer Survivalist Art
       
     
Jillian Mayer Survivalist Art

JILLIAN MAYER SURVIVALIST ART / OPENING RECEPTION 6-8pm APRIL 7, 2018

Jillian Mayer’s exhibition entitled Survivalist Art functions as a kind of showroom of prototypes for art in a state of emergency.

Jillian Mayer’s approach to our electronically mediated condition is burlesque, a whimsical but incisive staging of the awkward physicality and state of distraction that accompany use of tech devices. The artist’s Slumpies are part furniture, part sculpture, designed for sitting or reclining in a way that configures the body for comfort while holding a mobile phone. They are also large, irregular, roughly textured blob forms, many with odd excrescences and pockets and lumpy, tubular bars or rings. This reads as a droll critique of the slick ergonomics of modernist design, the clean, sharp lines of silver metal and pale wood, the white and grey austerity. Slumpies are painted like a children’s art project in bright pastels and neons, metallics, and glitter. The result is like a crash between a Lynda Benglis and an Andrea Zittel, perhaps creating a pile-up with Niki de Saint Phalle and Marta Minujin. This is a pleasing and witty collision. Also, because the objects look like the ersatz rocks in zoo exhibits as vandalized by a club kid, gallery visitors who occupy the artworks tend to resemble creatures on display in an artificial habitat, performing their most typical behavior (staring at a hand-held screen) for observers.

One of the most evocative aspects of the Slumpies is the materials from which they’re constructed and their consequent functionality. Made of fiberglass, epoxy resin, and Amazon Prime cardboard boxes, the Slumpies offer not only a surreal mode of posture support for staring at a screen, they also float. This comical and endearing feature seems aimed satirically at ecological crisis. If coastal art centers (the artist’s own Miami, or New York, or Los Angeles) are inundated by rising sea levels or mega storms, lucky art lovers might survive – and keep texting – using these awkward, colorful rafts. The tethering to electronic experience that Mayer’s Slumpies and painting both depict is also represented in the use of the Amazon boxes, which are emblematic of virtual consumption. These boxes represent access from anywhere to an infinity of products, a complete temporal and geographic dislocation of object consumption that parallels the total access to information or communication via the internet. Amazon boxes are ubiquitous symbols of globalization, so integrating these into evidently singular, hand-wrought, eccentric interactive objects reworks the darkly banal debris of hyper-capitalism into an aesthetic and embodied encounter.

A key art historical influence on Mayer’s work seems to be historical Pop, which is grounded in commercial and industrial design, including the appropriation of trends in illustration like the simulation of naive abstraction in rendering the figure. Pop is full of schematic bodies and flat silhouettes in equally cursory or cartoonish environments. Mayer’s paintings parallel this playful neglect of detail and depth in favor of formal punch and antic, irreverent subjects, primarily our constant use of personal technology devices. The simplified figures in candy colors evoke Pop artists like Evelyne Axell or Kiki Kogelnik. Unlike art about electronic alienation based in anxiety over a dystopian future, Mayer’s paintings offers a sympathetic caricature of how this alienation makes us appear in the present.

Another extensive body of work consists of improvised emergency gear of very questionable functionality. Mayer offers an MFA’s version of survivalist equipment where camouflage and olive drab are replaced with painterly purple, rose, and teal washes on “tarps” and “ladders” made of loose, hand-twisted cloth. The aesthetic is Arte povera + Urban Outfitters + doomsday prep. This is a sendup of our current condition of bracing for apocalypse. The futile versions of objects designed to insure self-sufficiency speak to America’s atavistic individualism as a ridiculous – even dangerous – ideal. The messy, ineffective camping supplies look like the debris left behind by an art student rapture cult (that endured for less than a week before giving up and going home). Like much of Mayer’s work, these tools against catastrophe are mordantly humorous, but they are also darker than her approach to our dependency on screens. Reflecting our anxiety over the increasingly hazardous misrule to which we are hostage, Mayer’s “emergency” works may be fanciful, but they are also ominous.

- Rachel Baum

Jillian Mayer is an artist and filmmaker living in South Florida. Mayer’s work explores how technology and the internet affects our identities, lives and experiences. Through videos, online experiences, photography, telephone numbers, performance, sculpture and installation, her work investigates the tension between physical and digital iterations of identity and existence.

Her video works and performances have been premiered at galleries and museums internationally such as MoMA PS1 MoCA:NoMi, BAM, Bass Museum, the Contemporary Museum of Montreal with the Montreal Biennial, and film festivals such as Sundance, SXSW, the New York Film Festival and over fifty others. She was recently featured in Art Papers, ArtNews. 

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Aaron Wrinkle LA Salon
       
     
Aaron Wrinkle LA Salon

 

AARON WRINKLE
LA SALON /  OPENING RECEPTION 6-8pm FEBRUARY 24, 2018

 

Aaron Wrinkle carefully pauses and rewinds the drive towards conceptual negation that has propelled art since the ‘70s. The intention to embed critique within the artwork can become self- reflexive. Contemporary painting is expected to demonstrate its social-analytical relevance in a way similar to how mid-century painting had to demonstrate its autonomy. Contemporary critics tend to demand that painting in particular be aware of its art historical deaths and that it prove its right to an afterlife through either canny self-deconstruction or delivery of discursive content (communicating a message). After over fifty years of valuing dematerialization, the interrogation of artistic context, and the skeptical analysis of creative subjectivity, we are somewhat suspicious of the combination of painting and pleasure. And yet, paintings by definition have affect, a somatic projection composed of the residues of their embodied making (materials, touch, gazes). These resonate for the engaged viewer in a way that is more mordant and haunted than can be contained by explanation.

Wrinkle’s development as an artist was shaped by picturaphobia. His art school training in the anti- object values of conceptualism directed him towards performance, curatorial collaborations, and ephemeral installations. In adding a rigorous painting practice to these media of refusal and examination, Wrinkle does not intend to leave behind the art of ideas, but rather to experiment with painting as a vehicle of many related principles such as art historical confrontation, the constraints of found materials, and thinking about embodiment.

Conceptual artists have informed Wrinkle’s work continuously, notably Douglas Huebler and Dan Graham. He has taken these artists’ agnosticism in relation to painting as a challenge to integrate, if not reconcile, semiotics and expression. Wrinkle offers, “Michael Asher once stated he didn't understand how painting could be conceptual. I find that to be a realistic approach – a question to figure out.” This poker-faced interpretation of negation as an invitation to inquiry is part of the humor of Wrinkle’s painting. It’s art historical quotations are about learning and play rather than collecting dead things. The material frankness of the simplified color studies and the awkward textures and dimensions of the previously used canvases looks like the result of an Intro to Modernism correspondence course conducted by mail – in a good way. The approach is not naïve, but it’s open-ended. Strategies of sincerity are usually either ironic or a sign of oblivious privilege. Wrinkle navigates around those snares precisely through trial and error, by posing visual questions, and by ignoring the premise that thesis and feeling are mutually exclusive.

 

-Rachel Baum

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Salomon Huerta Still Lifes
       
     
Salomon Huerta Still Lifes

 

SALOMON HUERTA STILL LIFES / JANUARY 6-FEBRUARY 10, 2018

 

Huerta’s painting style is in the tradition of Pop realism, where the textures of the visible are smoothed out and the contours sharpened with a somewhat flattening, graphic effect. These simplified surfaces with clear but creamy edges are often rendered with paint that thickens and swirls unexpectedly in a background passage of the picture. Huerta’s facture has a dimensionality that exceeds the modest illusionism of his depictions. The artist has described how a dense opacity of paint can create an internal glow and this is evident in the still life works in particular. These paintings suggest Giorgio Morandi with the light of Southern California rather than Northern Italy.

Huerta’s body of work includes many portraits without faces – masked luchadores, figures with heads turned away or cropped out. His still life paintings are faceless portraits in their own way as well, both self-portraits and evocations of the artist’s father. In place of the father’s likeness are memory- objects – startling, mundane, and elegiac. The repetition between paintings suggests memory itself, reiterations of something experienced that changes in the retelling. Each time, on a corner of table that shades from cool gray to rosy cream, two or three items sit, one of which is always a wood-handled pistol. The gun rotates across the various paintings, turning each time on the table, but always at rest, casting different densities of shadow. The other item is food or drink – milk, water, an apple, a nopale cactus pad. The gun is Huerta’s father’s and the artist would bring the refrigerios to him and place them on the bedside table, alongside the weapon. The still life objects are an austere ofrenda. The father is to be served and appeased in exchange for his powers to provide and guard. The pistol surprises the viewer, but does not seem to signify threat. It is intimate rather than aggressive. This is an oblique and biographical reference to living in Boyle Heights and to the protection of family in an environment of violence.

Luchadores are theatrically brave, an entertaining performance of male conflict. The masks of the fighters resemble the ski masks of criminals, but festively colorful. As with the recumbent pistol, these strange covered faces read as masculine power without danger. Presenting Chicano pop culture and daily life with sensitive conversance, Huerta’s look at the familiar – both personal and cultural – is a challenge to our moment of oppressive stereotypes and objectification, of grotesque fantasies of separation and difference such as “beautiful” border walls. Huerta’s work is framed by our nation’s grim and painful backlash against brown skin and polyglot communities, against affinities and attractions, shared ideas and desires across traditions. Salomon Huerta’s work stands on its own as rich and allusive reflection on identity, but it stands out right now as a reserve of humane nuance in a time of vicious regression.

-Rachel Baum

Anthony James
       
     
Anthony James

 

ANTHONY JAMES / OCTOBER 6-DECEMBER 31, 2017

 

Anthony James’ work takes up the concepts of the universal and transcendental in order to demonstrate the impossibility of their representation. The historical cosmology of Plato is a primary inspiration, both for the sculptures of icosahedrons and for the silhouette of Baroque architect Francesco Borromini’s dome for Sant’Ivo in Rome. Colorful rings of neon nod to the ancient concept of the universe as a set of concentric planetary orbits.The effect is both esoteric and industrial, orphic and distinctly concrete. Modern art historical references abound as well – Bruce Nauman, Ellsworth Kelly, Minimalism – but the artist’s attention is on the wonderment and possibility presented by distant ideals.

Borromini was an adept of Neoplatonism and the designs of his buildings are expressions of its celestial symbolisms. Platonism posits a universe of ideal order and form accessible to reason.To echo this order and those forms in the material human realm is to attempt to synchronize our chaotic mortal world of appearances and sensations with the models of perfection attainable through the intellect. James’ sculptures and wall installations are representations of these metaphysical models. Because depiction of something beyond experience is impossible, James’ artworks have a peculiar sensibility, the melancholy precision and intentness of simulations.

The immersive, fluid convexity of space in Sant’Ivo becomes a thin, curved plane in metal hammered by hand to a muted sheen. It is the dome’s miniaturized, materialized shadow. Borromini’s revolutionary twisting star design has fallen into the present as a dark, contoured plane of steel that nonetheless retains some of the grace of the architectural original in the curves and points along its edges.

Icosahedrons – the geometric globes of twenty identical triangular facets – were a mathematical experiment in unity used by Plato to demonstrate an ideal compositional system of perfect symmetry in three dimensions. In a twenty-first century gallery space, the glass, steel, titanium, and LED structures bring a rigid and gleaming tangibility to the abstraction of the numerical calculation of flawless coherence. James’ objects are compelling approximations, facsimiles of understanding and belief thou- sands of years old that come down to us on our own terms of modern metals and technological light.

The neon spectrum works that provide the title for James’ exhibition are particularly poignant in the tension between references, effects, and materials. The Absolute Zero works are meticulously calibrated spectra of colored neon tubes arranged in concentric circles to evoke the radiance of sacred enlightenment.The hue and intensity of the colors are designed to create white light.The historical references here span empirical experimentation with prisms to the image, across cultures, of the universe-wheel. Neon is already in our time a somewhat outworn material and the visible wires and plugs that trail from the vibrant rings interrupt any illusions of transcendence.This is the paradox that James’ objects show, a formal certainty and perspicuity (exact symmetry, white light, accurate shape) that registers a loss of purity or autonomy or wholeness. His works illustrate ideals, but they themselves are very contingent and actual, particular, not universal: they are for today.

-Rachel Baum

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there-there at Fort Gansevort NY
       
     
there-there at Fort Gansevort NY

Anthony James "Fabulism," Fort Gansevort May 18th-July 8th

5 Ninth Avenue NYC 10014

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